Walking to Meet Health Guidelines: The Effect of Prompting Frequency and Prompt Structure

ArticleinHealth Psychology 14(2):164-70 · April 1995with44 Reads
DOI: 10.1037//0278-6133.14.2.164 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
This study assessed the effects of frequency of prompting (phone calls once a week versus once every 3 weeks) and structure of prompting (high versus low structure) in 135 participants (132 women and 3 men) in a walking program designed to meet the American College of Sports Medicine's cardiovascular exercise goals. Survival analysis using 6 months of data points and using the criteria of walking at least 20 min a day for at least 3 times per week indicated an effect for more frequent versus less frequent prompting (46% and 13%) but not for high- versus low-structure prompting (30% and 31%). The results suggested the efficacy of frequent prompting delivered in inexpensive ways as a means to increase exercise adherence and the further parametric study of other basic behavior change strategies.

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    • After the first Retention Week, there was about 67-68% retention of Harsh and Soft message effects; after the second Retention Week, there was about 48% retention of the Harsh message effects but the Soft message effects were completely eliminated (Table 7). That the effects fall off after 2 weeks are in line with other prompting frequency studies that remind participants to perform activities such as exercise regularly – these found that weekly reminders were more effective compared to reminders sent out every 3 weeks (Lombard, Lombard, & Winett, 1995The occurrence of fatalities during a crash is also related to the speed of the vehicle(s) involved – a 5% reduction in average vehicle speed is estimated to reduce the number of fatal crashes by as much as 30% (Global Road Safety Partnership, 2015). We observed that while some drivers continued to drive above the respective legal limits, drivers who had received the warning generally did so at a lower speed compared to the control group (Tables 8 and 9).
    Article · Feb 2017
    • From a policy perspective, targeting physical activity through interventions that build on social cohesion is practical because it is less costly (Heath et al., 2012). For example, the creation of physical activity support groups within communities has been found to be an effective, low-cost method of increasing walking (Kriska et al., 1986; Lombard et al., 1995). Moreover, social support interventions and several other community-based interventions aimed at promoting physical activity were deemed to be cost-effective public health strategies for preventing chronic disease (Roux et al., 2008).
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    Full-text · Article · Dec 2016
    • Ubiquity of symbols of the fast food culture is so overwhelming and overpowering that competing messages have little chance to engage nonconscious information processing. On the other hand, researchers have documented that individually tailored messages change exercise behavior (e.g., Kahn et al., 2002; Lombard, Lombard, & Winett, 1995 ). Such messages are effective because they make people consciously think about the meaning of exercise and reasons for doing it (see Adriaanse, de Ridder, & de Wit, 2009), form if–then plans or " implementation intentions " for exercise (Gollwitzer, 1999, p. 494), and simultaneously protect goal pursuits from the onslaught of negative situational and behavioral primes (Gollwitzer et al., 2011 ).
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2016
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